Sidewalks in or leading to Downtown

It sounds like it’s only a matter of time.

Just a point of clarification here: the right-of-way and private property are two distinct areas. A lot of folks might think their property extends out a certain distance to the road, but more often than not, it doesn’t. Any land that’s in the ROW isn’t yours even if you’ve been using it as such. iMAPS is a good resource to determine that.

Yes. That’s understood by me. Not so sure it is by others.

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Yeah, I meant that to be more of a PSA than a reply to you specifically.

I was looking at iMaps this morning and found the right of way in the suburban neighborhood where I grew up to be interesting. While the neighborhood has sidewalks, it often only has them on one side of a street, while having none at all in cul-de-sacs. In the case of my immediate childhood neighborhood, the side of the street with a sidewalk seems to have a deeper right of way than the side that doesn’t. The right of way in cul-de-sacs also seem to be narrower. Sidewalks in this specific neighborhood have that strip of landscaped land between the sidewalk and the street. I suspect that any additional sidewalks there would have to be immediately against the street without the buffer.

(Boston)

This sidewalk is roughly 7’ wide, imagine if it were 4-6’ like the majority of the existing sidewalks on the outskirts of town.

This is an ADA issue that needs be addressed in every neighborhood with a school, especially elementary and middle schools.

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