City of Raleigh Municipal Campus


#129

Wow, you clearly have too much time on your hands :smile:
I think your idea to subtly include the Raleigh logo is beyond amazing. Well done!


#130

I would say that his time is very well spent…:grin:


#131

(I literally just skimmed through the Plan for like five minutes, and took another 5min to sketch out the first thing that popped into my head lol… but) thank you haha


#132

It’s missing the canned cream corn dispenser but I dig it. Maybe instead of wood they can cover the front of one of the towers with a very large artisit 2D metal oak tree with color changing lights as backlights.

Think of the Edith Green - Wendell Wyatt Federal in Portland but with oak tree design and light show.


#133

I think building a modern wooden structure for these buildings would be the perfect way to make these buildings POP. Some of the tall wood buildings being proposed and built now are incredible. image


Just a couple I found on a quick google search.


#134

IDK, would wood still be fashionable in 30 years? How will it look in 50 years? Remember all the ugly mid-century building using at the time trendy materials like Poe Hall at NCSU.


#135

Wood isn’t trendy, lol, it’s the most basic building material. Large timber framing is actually very strong too, but it’s super expensive. Although, it’s probably more attractive as steel prices skyrocket due to tariffs


#136

There’s a difference between functional timber used to support buildings and decorative wood panelling. This is a 20 story building it will be made of concrete and steel. Any wood will be decorative and must withstand extreme Carolina temp gradient, humidity, high winds, etc. I don’t trust the City of Raleigh to do anything tastefully.

This is the same city that approved the design of the Residence Inn by the Convention Center after all.


#137

That federal building is sharp. If we got a design that was anywhere close to that I would be ecstatic.


#138

I’m pretty sure the city of raleigh can’t approve or prevent a building based on appearance. They can set structural guidelines and make requests, but they can place 0 demands on aesthetics.


#139

If that’s so, then why do they have an Appearance Commission?


#140

If the city is both the client and controls the approval. They sure as Hell can make demands about design and aesthetics.


#141

There’s plenty of tall buildings being made by timber framing these days. I just think that it’s probably a little too cutting edge for Raleigh since the US is lagging behind… Oregon was the first state to legalize mass timber high rises just last month.

Globally, proposals are becoming quite common since mass timber construction is actually more fire resistant than concrete and steel, and it has a lot of other benefits as well. It’s just really expensive right now.

Toronto

Amsterdam, currently the world’s tallest under construction at 21 storeys.
image

Stockholm, with a 34-story proposal by CF Moller.

One can dream :slight_smile:


#142

Interesting and unique looking…:face_with_raised_eyebrow:

But as a tree hugger I have to ask about the type of wood/lumber being utilized? :thinking:

Don’t make me tie myself to one of these buildings…:open_mouth:


#143

Concrete and Steel have to be mined from the earth, beneath of areas that otherwise would be forested or grassland. Timber is a renewable resource. Of course I would bet my first born child that RMC will be concrete/steel, but timber buildings are really intriguing. The “greenest building in the world” is a 6 story timber framed building in Seattle http://www.bullittcenter.org/


#144

For this project, sure. I was replying to the earlier comment about their approval for the Marriott.


#145

Completely agree! Great idea incorporating the logo into the building design!


#146

Haha don’t worry, I’m a tree-hugger too. Mass timber is actually more environmentally friendly than other methods of construction, provided that the timber is harvested responsibly. There was a widely circulated study that found using wood as a building-material substitute could save 14 to 31 percent of global CO2 emissions and 12 to 19 percent of global fossil fuel consumption if using sustainable wood growth.

Remember that the vast majority of deforestation is due to land conversion, i.e. development or agriculture. Wood harvesting for the building industry would happen in sustainably managed forests. Read more about it here, if you’re interested.

EDIT: but this is the last I should say about this. Trying to stay on topic, and @evan.j.bost is right. Chances for Raleigh at this time are slim to none.


#147

gov’t buildings don’t add much to street life. Fayettville St Mall of old was a wide open plaza surround by gov’t buildings and turned into a ghost town every day at 5pm.

Does the mixed use come in the first phase? The gov’t complex will be hopping at lunch time, but gov’t offices by themselves are mostly just spaces that suburban workers will commute to every morning.


#148

The whole fire protection via charred wood thing seems like BS to me. It certainly doesn’t stop my camp fire logs from reigniting. The buildings have to be soaked in fire retardant and built with correct fire stops and gaps…which is fine and stuff, but don’t anyone get the idea that if you slap up some wooden building that a blow torch won’t burn it up a million times faster than a concrete and steel building without technique and mods to the wood. Are these things controlled for type of wood? The strengths vary widely depending on the tree species. How wide are the lower level central supports? I am not dissing the idea, so much as I have a ton of questions still.